Amazon plans use of drones to deliver orders


A flying ‘octocopter’ mini-drone, which would be used to fly small packages to consumers. Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos revealed on December 1 that his company was looking to the future with plans to use mini-drones to deliver small packages. Photo - AFP/Amazon

Los Angeles: Want that Amazon order in just 30 minutes? Company CEO Jeff Bezos says he hopes to soon deploy an armada of mini-drones able to drop small packages at your doorstep.

The US online retail giant's revolutionary project still needs extra safety testing and federal approval, but Bezos believes that Amazon "Prime Air" would be up and running within four to five years. "These are effectively drones but there's no reason that they can't be used as delivery vehicles," Bezos told CBS television's "60 Minutes" programme late on Sunday.

"I know this looks like science fiction. It's not," he said.

'Half-hour delivery'
"We can do half-hour delivery . . .  and we can carry objects, we think, up to five pounds (2.3 kilograms), which covers 86 per cent of the items that we deliver."

A video posted on the company's website shows a prototype drone. The body of the device is about the size of a flat-screen monitor, and it is attached to eight small helicopter rotors and sits on four tall legs.

The claws under the belly of the "octocopter" then latch onto a standard sized plastic bucket that rolls down a conveyer belt at Amazon's distribution centre. Inside the bucket is the order.

The drone lifts off and whizzes into the air like a giant mechanical insect to deliver the package just 30 minutes after clicking the "pay" button on Amazon.com. Then it returns to base.

The mini-drones are powered by environmentally-friendly electric motors and can cover areas within a 16-kilometre radius of fulfillment centres, thus covering a significant portion of the population in urban areas. The drones operate autonomously and follow the GPS coordinates they receive to drop the items off at target locations.

'Very green'
"It's very green, it's better than driving trucks around," said Bezos. "The hard part here is putting in all the redundancy, all the reliability, all the systems you need to say, 'Look, this thing can't land on somebody's head while they're walking around their neighbourhood,'" Bezos told CBS.

Share 

 Rate this Article
Rates : 1, Average : 4

Share more.

Post a Comment

Did you like this section? Leave a comment!
Your Name : Your Email Address :
Your Comment :
Enter Image Text:

Reader Comments




Then, step by step, is the human future, inevitably, the direct and full-time relation with an intelligent machine? A sort of tech-priest who interferes between God and mankind, between nature and human beings and between human beings themselves?

That is, will a machine be the whole environment, a virtual playground? If so, will human beings return to this new technological mother womb, inside mechanical egg-dresses? However, what is the relationship in which a machine cannot take part or channel at all? Why wont the future automatons be alive? What is the fundamental difference between a peculiar and mechanical structure that imitates life and life itself?

Is there any, virtual or real? Can materialistic and mechanical points of view be overcome? Anyway, if machines take over all human activity, including art and science, what will happen to the organic body and its conditioned-to-work-and-think brain?

Surely, will it decay? Is coexistence possible while people is fighting for jobs and resources: competition, nations, and so on? If one wants to go on questioning, there is more like that in a highly recommended and different book, take a look in a sample in goo.gl/IUlSMu If you feel like a humble organic machine




Label


s