Times of Oman
Nov 27, 2015 LAST UPDATED AT 08:22 PM GMT
New iPhone-linked hearing aids give ears software upgrade
April 28, 2014 | 12:00 AM
Today most people who wear hearing aids, eyeglasses, prosthetic limbs and other accessibility devices do so to correct a disability. But new hearing aids point to the bionic future of disability devices

Dick Loizeaux recently found himself meandering through a noisy New York nightclub. 

This was unusual; Loizeaux, a 65-year-old former pastor, began suffering hearing loss nearly a decade ago, and nightclubs are not really his scene. "They're the absolute worst place to hear anybody talk," he said.

But this time was different. Loizeaux had gone to the club to test out the GN ReSound Linx, one of two new models of advanced hearing aids that can be adjusted precisely through software built into Apple's iPhone.

When he entered the club, Loizeaux tapped on his phone to switch his hearing aids into "restaurant mode." The setting amplified the sound coming from the hearing aids' forward-facing microphones, reducing background noise. 

To play down the music, he turned down the hearing aids' bass level and bumped up the treble. Then, as he began chatting with a person standing to his left, Loizeaux tapped his phone to favour the microphone in his left hearing aid, and to turn down the one in his right ear.

The results were striking. "After a few adjustments, I was having a comfortable conversation in a nightclub,"

Loizeaux told me during a recent phone interview — a phone call he would have had difficulty making with his older hearing aids. "My wife was standing next to me in the club and she was having trouble having the same conversation, and she has perfect hearing."

The devices can stream phone calls and music directly to your ears from your phone. 

They can tailor their acoustic systems to your location; when the phone detects that you have entered your favourite sports bar, it adjusts the hearing aids to that environment.

The hearing aids even let you transform your phone into an extra set of ears. If you're chatting with your co-worker across a long table, set the phone in front of her, and her words will stream directly to your ears.

iPhone-linked hearing aids
When I recently tried out the Linx and the Halo, another set of iPhone-connected hearing aids made by the US hearing aid company Starkey, I was floored. Wearing these hearing aids was like giving my ears a software upgrade.

Today most people who wear hearing aids, eyeglasses, prosthetic limbs and other accessibility devices do so to correct a disability. But new hearing aids point to the bionic future of disability devices.

As they merge with software baked into our mobile computers, devices that were once used simply to fix whatever ailed us will begin to do much more. In time, accessibility devices may even let us surpass natural human abilities.

One day all of us, not just those who need to correct some physical deficit, may pick up a bionic accessory or two.

"There is a way in which this technology will give people with hearing loss the ability to outperform their normal-hearing counterparts," said Dave Fabry, Starkey's vice-president for audiology and professional relations.

In the beginning, these devices might monitor users' health — for instance, they could keep an eye on a patient's blood pressure or glucose levels — but more advanced models could display a digital overlay on your everyday life.

Major problem
Hearing aids are the natural place to begin our bionic quest. About 36 million American adults report some degree of hearing loss, according to the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, but only about a fifth of the people who would benefit from a hearing aid use one.

That's because hearing aids, as a bit of technology, have long seemed stuck in the past.

"Most people picture large, clunky banan

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